Electioneering

This election is going to be a hard one for me. I have no freaking clue who to vote for–such is the tumult of political views at the moment.

I take that back. I have SOME clue. For example: voting against Jan Brewer (any EVERY other politician soiled by HB1070) is a no-brainer.

But what about the senate race? Do I vote for John McCain? I liked him a lot more as a centrist moderate–and a lot less as someone fighting tooth and claw to hold on to his seat. But the democrat candidate talks worryingly about the government creating jobs, about government being the solution to our problems. And the libertarian candidate (like most libertarians) is just a crackpot. (END THE FED! END THE FED! RABBLE RABBLE RABBLE!!!)

But what about the congressional race? The democratic candidate, Rebecca Schneider, supports the environmental issues I hold near and dear, and seems to have taken Econ 101. Consider her stance on job creation: “It is imperative that we bring new jobs to District 6. But remember, Congress doesn’t ‘create’ jobs – businesses do.” She then goes on to explain some measures that can support small businesses. Seems reasonable, right?

But the republican, Jeff Flake, opposes farm subsidies, is “an unapologetic proponent of free trade,” and “strongly believes in the free market.” What a heart throb. But he pits my environment-loving barefoot hippie self against my free market, capitalism loving rational self. Grr…

Not to mention the contradictions inherent in my ballot initiative choices. It’s not cognitive dissonance–I know that I’m simultaneously voting FOR measures that cost money, and AGAINST measures that would help the state of Arizona collect that money. It’s rational, to the extent that I’m not the one that is charged with balancing the state’s budget. It quite makes sense: “Do you want more services that benefit you? Yes! Do you want to pay for those services? No!” What’s irrational about that?

And then there’s all the other races. And the 12 ballot initiatives. Being an independent voter is more work than it’s cracked up to be–you can’t vote party line if you don’t have an affiliated part. Alas. Time to stop blogging and drive to the polls.

About Mark Egge

Two truths and a lie: Mark Egge is an outdoor enthusiast, opera singer, and a transportation data scientist. He lives in Bozeman, Montana.
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